Weekly updates of the budget and appropriation process - news events that affect your digestive health.

 

We will update you on the federal budget process which includes a detailed spending plan. Each fiscal year (FY) runs from October 1 through September 30 of the following year. As authorized by the Constitution, Congress is in charge of deciding the budget, granting the power to collect taxes, borrow money and approve spending.

 

March 2020

House and Senate Labor-HHS appropriations subcommittees held hearings on February 27th with Health and Human Services Secretary Azar. Congress is prepared to spend emergency funding to respond to needs identified by health officials. On March 5th, President Trump signed the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act (H.R. 6074) allotting $8.3 billion in emergency spending to respond to the outbreak.

 

February 2020

The House and Senate are both holding subcommittee hearings in the beginning of March to examine the proposed budget of the National Institutes of Health for FY 2021. These links will provide upcoming hearing information for the House and Senate appropriations subcommittees.

House and Senate Labor-HHS appropriations subcommittees held hearings on February 27th with Health and Human Services Secretary Azar. Much of the time at the hearing was dedicated to discussing questions about the coronavirus and the adequacy of the administration’s request for supplemental funding to respond to the public health threat. Congress is preparing to spend emergency funding to respond to needs identified by health officials. Read Secretary Azar's oral testimony to the House Committee on Ways and Means here.

 

 

FY 2021 Appropriations

The President's administration budget proposal for FY 2021 was issued to Congress on February 10. These funding recommendations do not conform to the two-year budget deal released last year. Congress will now examine this budget proposal and develop the twelve annual appropriations bulls based on funding levels provided by the two-year budget deal. Find the entire budget document here.

 

  • $6.21 billion for FDA, a proposed increase of $265 million above FY 2020.

    • $2.02 billion for Human Drugs at FDA, a proposed increase of $49 million over FY 2020. 

    • $1.12 billion in Prescription Drug User Fees at FDA, a proposed increase of $52 million over FY 2020.

    • $526 million in Generic Drug User Fees at FDA, a proposed increase of $10 million over FY 2020.

    • $425 million for Biologics at FDA, a proposed increase of $6 million over FY 2020. 

    • $43 million in Biosimilar User Fees at FDA, a proposed increase of $1 million over FY 2020.

  • $7 billion for CDC, a proposed decrease of $693.29 million below FY 2020.

    • $813 million for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at CDC, a proposed decrease of $427 million from FY 2020. 

  • Individual chronic disease programs are consolidated into a new proposed block grant program.

  • $38.69 billion for NIH, a proposed decrease of $2.99 billion below FY 2020.

      • $2.01 billion for the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at NIH, a proposed decrease of $191 million from FY 2020.

      • $788 million for the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at NIH, a proposed decrease of $45 million from FY 2020.$2.1 billion for the Office of the Director at NIH, a proposed decrease of $148 million from FY 2020.

      • $788 million for the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at NIH, a proposed decrease of $45 million from FY 2020.

    $2.1 billion for the Office of the Director at NIH, a proposed decrease of $148 million from FY 2020.

 

 

FY 2020 Appropriations

Congressional leaders and administration officials have agreed on a comprehensive package for Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 spending which includes all 12 annual appropriations bills that are lumped into two minibus spending measures. Find a press release from the House Committee on Appropriations containing a full summary and the minibus text here.

 

Key spending highlights of the bills include:

  • $95 billion in discretionary spending for the Department of Health & Human Services, an increase of $4.4 billion above FY 2019.
  • $7.3 billion for the Health Resources and Services Administration, an increase of $177 million above FY 2019.
  • $8 billion for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an increase of $636 million above FY 2019.
  • $41.7 billion for the National Institutes of Health, an increase of $2.6 billion above FY 2019.
  • $5.9 billion for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, an increase of $140 million above FY 2019.
  • $338 million for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, level-funded with FY 2019.
  • $73 billion in discretionary spending for the Department of Education, an increase of $1.3 billion above FY 2019.
  • $800 million for the VA Medical and Prosthetic Research Program, an increase of $20 million above FY 2019.
  • $34 billion for the Defense Health Program, level-funded with FY 2019.
  • $5.77 billion including user fees and $3.16 billion in discretionary funding for the Food and Drug Administration, an increase of $91 million above FY 2019.

 

January 2020

Retiring House Appropriations Committee Chairperson Nita Lowey (D-NY) is expected to push the FY 2021 bills out of committee during her last year in office, and there is similar optimism in the Senate for swift committee action.

 

For FY 2021, the expectation is that appropriators will hit the ground running in February once the administration’s budget proposal is issued (on the 10th). The recent overarching budget deal covers both FY 2020 and FY 2021, so there is relatively little holding back the FY 2021 process. Retiring House Appropriations Committee Chairperson Nita Lowey (D-NY) is expected to push the FY 2021 bills out of committee as expeditiously as possible during her last year in office, and there is similar optimism in the Senate for swift committee action.

 

 

 

 

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